MAXIMUM MUSCULAR POWER
(High-Speed Strength)

Equipment

• A smooth wall with a ceiling higher than the

highest jumper’s jump height

• A flat floor with good traction

• Chalk of a different color than the wall

• Measuring tape or stick

• Permissible alternative: a commercial device for

vertical jump testing (e.g., Vertec)

Personnel

• One tester/recorder

Procedure (Using a Wall and Chalk)

1. The tester rubs chalk on the fingertips of the

athlete’s dominant hand.

2. The athlete stands with the dominant shoulder

about 6 inches (15 cm) from the wall and, with

both feet flat on the floor, reaches as high as

possible with the dominant hand and makes a

chalk mark on the wall.

3. The athlete then lowers the dominant hand and,

without a preparatory or stutter step, performs

a countermovement by quickly flexing the

knees and hips, moving the trunk forward and

downward, and swinging the arms backward

(figure 13.2a). During the jump, the dominant

arm reaches upward while the nondominant arm

moves downward relative to the body.

4. At the highest point in the jump, the athlete

places a second chalk mark on the wall with the

fingers of the dominant hand, using a swiping

motion of the fingers. The score is the vertical

distance between the two chalk marks.

5. The best of three trials is recorded to the nearest

0.5 inches or 1.0 cm.

Procedure (Using a Commercial Vertec Device)

1. The tester adjusts the height of the stack of

movable color-coded horizontal plastic vanes to

be within the athlete’s standing reach height. The

highest vane that can be reached and pushed

forward with the dominant hand while the athlete

stands flat-footed determines the standing

touch height.

2. The vane stack is then raised by a measured distance

(marked on the shaft holding the vanes) so

that the athlete will not jump higher or lower than

the set of vanes. This requires a rough estimate

of how high the particular athlete will jump, but

a correction can be made on the second attempt

if necessary.

3. Without a preparatory or stutter step, the athlete

performs a countermovement by quickly flexing

the knees and hips, moving the trunk forward

and downward, and swinging the arms backward

(figure 13.2a). During the jump, the dominant

arm reaches upward while the nondominant arm

moves downward relative to the body.

4. At the highest point in the jump, the athlete taps

the highest possible vane with the fingers of

the dominant hand (figure 13.2b). The score is

the vertical distance between the height of the

highest vane tapped during the standing vertical

reach and the vane tapped at the highest point

of the jump.

5. The best of three trials is recorded to the nearest

0.5 inches or 1 cm (the distance between

adjacent vanes).

Note: Descriptive data for the vertical jump are presented

in table 13.7 near the end of the chapter.

Fitness Equipments
Max File Size 15MB

YOUR NAME

WELCOME

STARTER PACK

Vertical Jump

PRIMAL CONQUEST © ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This Website Was Designed And Built by Primal Conquest

Our Privacy Policy

  • Facebook - White Circle
  • Twitter - White Circle
  • YouTube - White Circle
  • Instagram - White Circle
  • LinkedIn - White Circle